Maryland Football Helmets

The Boston College Eagles college football team was established in 1892, when the college agreed to set up the team upon the request of Joseph O’Connell and John Drum, the latter becoming the team’s first coach. Since its inception the team has proven its worth as a formidable opponent, having won many of its matches among its long-standing rivals, the College of the Holy Cross and the University of Notre Dame. The team has also been ranked high in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) standings in recent years

In addition, the Boston College Eagles have been ranked among the country’s best among the college football teams for academic achievement, having garnered the highest mark possible in the polls for any college football team’s Academic Progress Rate. (APR) In addition, Boston College has been proud of its players from the team’s roster through the years that eventually made significant contributions to professional football; one of these players that stood out and made the Tigers a competitive team is Doug Flutie, who has been regarded as a legend in Boston College football history.

Based in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, the Eagles have been playing at the Alumni Stadium in the Boston College campus grounds since 1957, when the stadium was opened to replace the smaller Alumni Field grounds nearby.

Important Moments And Accomplishments

Throughout its history, the Boston College Eagles have appeared in a record of 19 post-season bowl appearances. The team last bowl appearance was on 2007’s Champs Sports Bowl when it defeated the Michigan State Spartans for the title. This victory would also mark the Eagles’ 8th straight bowl victory, a winning streak record which by itself is unprecedented in collegiate football history.

In addition, Boston College has also managed to snag a conference title when it was a member of the Big East Conference. Since becoming a member of the ACC, the team has managed to win the conference’s Atlantic Division championship in 2007 and be listed as one of the Top 10 college football teams by the Associated Press for that year.

Quarterbacks in the Current Roster

Currently, the team’s quarterbacks are composed  ข่าวบอล  of Alexander Atiyeh, Codi Boek, Chris Crane, Dominic Davis, Chris Johnson, Nick Loury, John Lowell, and Justin Tuggle.

Recent News

The Boston College Eagles has yet to win an ACC championship; this season, the team is looking forward to clinch its first conference title under the ACC. For Eagles Coach Jeff Jagodzinski and the players, this season so far is looking good for them. With an impressive record so far of 5 wins and only 1 loss during this current college football season, the team is optimistic in securing a slot in the conference slot and eventually win the title as well. For the fans of the Boston College Eagles, any home game of the team this season is certainly something to look forward to. And with the way things are going right now for the Eagles, the next remaining games will be interesting to watch for those who would like to see how far and how successful they will go in their dream for the title

Many times a youth football game won’t go the way you want or expect it to go. Sometimes you can even have the officiating apparently go against you. No one, not you or the officials are ever going to call a perfect game. Then there are other games where the other team just seems to get under your skin a little. Maybe their kids play a bit past the whistle or even jaw with some unkind or even swear word language. As youth football coaches, how should we respond?

Here is what one youth football coach did last week:

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Watch the video, the coach pushes a kid from the opposing team out of the handshake line by his facemask. This coache’s excuse was that this player had supposedly been using foul language in the game and was saying something negative to his kids as the players went through the handshake line. The player that was pushed played on the winning team, the coach doing the pushing was on the losing team. The coach stated that he wanted the kid to “knock it off” and was just “doing what he would do to his own son”.

Of course the pushed player and his parents claim the lad said nothing and is an angel on earth, a classic, he said, she said situation. They are pressing assault charges.

Does it really matter what the player said? What kind of an example did this coach set for his players? When confronted with a situation you feel you are being disrespected, answer with force. While most of us coaching youth football would like all the kids to behave as well as out own kids, do we have the right to handle all kids we come in contact with the same way we would our own children? The way I discipline my children is what works based on what my wife and I believe is right for our family and fits the personalities of our children, Our kids are well adjusted, fun, outgoing and well behaved. My guess is we are far stricter than 90% of the population and it works for us, but that doesn’t give me permission or the right to use the same methods on your kids, even if your kids are foul mouthed spoiled brats. Especially if your idea of discipline involves any type of physical contact.

What should this coach have done if this child had been acting in the way that he described?

He could have made note of the players number, the exact language the player was using and talked to the players coach well after the coaches and players had finished their post game meeting. The coach could have then used that supposed incident as a ‘teaching moment”, instructing his players what SHOULD be done in a handshake line and how by NOT responding they were doing the right thing. A better approach may have been to ask your players what they thought this players actions made the player look like to them. Hopefully your players would realize that acting in this fashion (if he did), what a buffoon and low life the jawing player appeared to all. Games should be settled on the football field not by jawing before, during or after games. Hopefully this is what your players learn from you and your actions.

Fortunately I’ve never been subjected to this type of behavior. I can think of just one time it was remotely even close. A player from the opposing team was flagged for a flagrant unsportsmanlike on the next to last play of the game. He had done the same thing on 2 previous occasions but had not been flagged for it. During the handshake line this kid had a smirk on his face a mile wide. I didn’t say anything nor did my players, the game was over and finished. We used it as a teaching moment for our kids. who by the way aren’t angels all the time either. We always hand out pop to the other team in the handshake line, after a loss we saw several of our players shaking up the pop so it would “explode” when opened. We addressed it immediately and aggressively (involved lots of running) and it never happened again. I guess if that’s the worst we have to deal with we are probably doing alright.

While this is a reprehensible act by the coach and he should be removed from coaching immediately and not allowed to coach again, is a lawsuit really necessary? The player had his equipment on and he wasn’t hurt. Wouldn’t a permanent ban on this coach and an apology to the player and both teams suffice?

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